One-Size Airplane Seat Does Not Fit All

 In Clinical Trials

For some patients, the idea of air travel can be daunting. Being an inexperienced traveler can be difficult, but imagine also having to worry about your special health needs while flying. Usually most medical conditions can be handled in the simple economy seat without too much hassle but, as any of the Clinical Trial Travel Coordinators will tell you, not everyone can balance their health needs while squeezing into a small seat.

A variety of solutions to help make patient travelers more comfortable

Sometimes they can’t fit because of their size and sometimes it’s a stiff leg that doesn’t bend well – no matter the reason, there are a variety of solutions to help make travelers more comfortable. Purchasing a premium economy seat or even a ticket in first class often helps those who need extra leg room. A second seat with a fully movable armrest provides great relief to passengers who find a single seat too small. Naturally these accommodations come at extra cost, but sometimes it is required if the patient is going to make their appointments.

On very rare occasion, there are patients whose health can’t be accommodated by first class. In these rare circumstances, Colpitts can rely on the services of air medical services to help fly these patients comfortably. These smaller aircrafts might have to make a pit stop on the way to their final destination, but having a dedicated team on a specially designed private plane makes a world of difference to those who truly need this service.

Making the journey to clinical trials less stressful

When we book travel for a patient, we always want to know what we can do to make their journey less stressful. The more we understand about the patient’s medical needs, the better we can assist with making their travel as seamless as possible.

-Victoria Dement

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